Mikroben im Bienenstock

Benutzeravatar
zaunreiter
Administrator
Beiträge: 4840
Registriert: Do 5. Aug 2010, 19:14
Wohnort: Niederrhein
Kontaktdaten:

Mikroben im Bienenstock

Beitragvon zaunreiter » Do 23. Sep 2010, 12:08

http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pd ... 85-6-4.pdf

Antagonistic interactions between honey bee bacterial symbionts and implications for disease
Jay D Evans* and Tamieka-Nicole Armstrong

Im Darm der Bienenlarve:

Acinetobacter

Bacillus (41 Spezies)

B. cereus
B. thuringiensis
B. fusiformis
B. flexus
B. mycoides
B. niabensis

Brevibacillus

Br. formosus
Br. centrosporus
Br. brevis

Stenotrophomonas

Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

Mehr Mikroben je älter die Larve:
7-day-old larvae than from one-day larvae
(28 of 55 larvae at 7 days, 28 of 306 larvae at 24 hr, G test,p < 0.0001; Table 2)

Acinetobacter johnsonii
Moraxella osloensis
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Buchnera aphidicola
Haemophilus aegyptius
Pasteurella aerogenes
Serratia sp
Xenorhabdus nematophila
Ruminal bacterium
Salmonella bovis
Klebsiella pneumoniae
Serratia marcescens
Vibrio cholerae
Shewanella putrefaciens
Bordetella avium
Taylorella equigenitalis
Burkholderia tropicalis
Kingella denitrificans
Thiobacillus aquaesulis
Thiobacillus thioparus
Apis Simonsiella sp
Xylella fastidiosa
Rhodanobacter lindaniclasticus
Thiothrix nivea
Beggiatoa alba
Thioploca ingrica
Legionella parisiensis
Thermophilic methanotroph
Solemya occidentalis
Apis Gluconacetobacter sp
Agrobacterium tumefaciens
Rhizobium etli
Apis Bartonella sp
Sinorhizobium xinjiangensis
Bradyrhizobium japonicum
Xanthobacter autotrophicus
Balastochloris sulfoviridis
Caulobacter crescentus
Sphingomonas aromaticivorans
Anaplasma ovis
Bacteroides forsythus
Prevotella buccalis
Helicobacter pylori
Thiomicrospira denitrificans
Geobacter grbicium
Stigmatella aurantiaca
Apis Lactobacillus sp
Lactobacillus plantarum
Weissella kimchii
Enterococcus faecalis
Enterococcus faecium
Lactococcus lactis
Streptococcus mutans
Streptococcus oralis
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Bacillus amyloliquefaciens
Bacillus subtilis
Bacillus pumilus
Bacillus permians
Bacillus pseudofirmus
Bacillus clausii
Bacillus coagulans
Bacillus thermoleovorans
Thermoactinomyces candidus
Bacillus anthracis
Bacillus thuringiensis
Bacillus megaterium
Bacillus sphaericus
Bacillus tipchiralis
Paenibacillus lentimorbus
Paenibacillus popilliae
Bacillus vortex
Brevibacillus agri
Fusobacterium necrophorum
Mycoplasma bovis
Sarcina ventriculi
Borrelia burgdorferi
Treponema denticola
Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis
Thermothrix thiopara
Rubrobacter radiotolerans
Clostridium indolis
Syntrophomonas saporvorans
Apis Bifidobacterium sp
Bifidobacterium cantenulatum
Bifidobacterium thermacidophilum
Corynebacterium diphtheriae
Corynebacterium glutamicum
Nocardia fluminea
Streptosporangiaceae str
Streptomyces scabies


Perhaps, as is apparent in the termites and ants [24,25], honey bees have evolved behavioral or physiological
mechanisms to enhance the transmission of beneficial microbes, while battling those species which are patho-
genic. This would indicate a delicate balancing act for bees and other social insects, allowing for the encouragement
of beneficial species while maintaining barriers against exploitation by pathogens. If so, discrimination at the lev-
els of behavior and individual immune responses might be used to bias the microbial biome within insect colonies
toward mutualists and against parasites and pathogens.

### ##### ########
http://ddr.nal.usda.gov/dspace/bitstrea ... 213044.pdf

The number of different bacteria and the overall population
size varied with the type of nectar the bees were collecting.

Because of the activity of microbes, bee bread differs in chemical composition from the pollen bees collect. In fact, certain compounds such as Vitamin K and lactic acids are found only in bee bread.

The cellular response involves the production of antibodies. The role of symbiotic microbes in the biochemical pathways that ultimatel y lead to the formation of antibodies is not known. At the least though, nutrition plays a role in providing the basic building blocks of the proteins needed to create antibodies. The amino acids used in the proteins are derived from pollen whose digestion is largely mediated by symbiotic microbes.
Cogito ergo summ.
Ich summe, also bien ich.

Benutzeravatar
zaunreiter
Administrator
Beiträge: 4840
Registriert: Do 5. Aug 2010, 19:14
Wohnort: Niederrhein
Kontaktdaten:

Re: Mikroben im Bienenstock

Beitragvon zaunreiter » Do 23. Sep 2010, 12:40

Cogito ergo summ.
Ich summe, also bien ich.

Manfred

Re: Mikroben im Bienenstock

Beitragvon Manfred » Mi 16. Feb 2011, 16:44

Grüß Dich, Bernhard

Ich schaffe es nicht, an Teil 2 + 3 dieser hochinteressanten Veröffentlichung im American Bee Journal ranzukommen. Kannst Du mir bitte helfen.

Ganz
am
Rande
bemerkt:
Klingelts
da
nicht
bei
einem
eifrigen
Humusforscher ?

Herzliche Grüße Manfred

Benutzeravatar
zaunreiter
Administrator
Beiträge: 4840
Registriert: Do 5. Aug 2010, 19:14
Wohnort: Niederrhein
Kontaktdaten:

Re: Mikroben im Bienenstock

Beitragvon zaunreiter » Mi 16. Feb 2011, 17:17

Ich habe die gleichen Probleme, an diese Artikel zu kommen.

Es klingelt, Manfred, es klingelt.

Bernhard
Cogito ergo summ.
Ich summe, also bien ich.

Manfred

Re: Mikroben im Bienenstock

Beitragvon Manfred » Mi 16. Feb 2011, 23:40


Benutzeravatar
zaunreiter
Administrator
Beiträge: 4840
Registriert: Do 5. Aug 2010, 19:14
Wohnort: Niederrhein
Kontaktdaten:

Re: Mikroben im Bienenstock

Beitragvon zaunreiter » Mo 21. Nov 2011, 21:30

Zu den gestellte Fragen kenne ich auch keine neueren Arbeiten. Das ist die Literatur, die mir bekannt ist:


--
Gilliam, Martha (1997) Identification and roles of non-pathogenic microflora associated with honey bees
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... 678.x/full

KaCaniova M, Chilebo R, Kopernicky M, Trakovicka A (2003) Microflora of the Honeybee Gastrointestinal Tract
http://www.springerlink.com/content/68g10110r6g70467/

Cano RJ, Borucki MK, Higby-Schweitzer M, Pionar HN (1994) Bacillus DNA in Fossil Bees: an Ancient Symbiosis?
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/article ... 3-0470.pdf

Microbiology of the insect gut: tales from mosquitoes and bees
http://www.ias.ac.in/jbiosci/sep2006/293.pdf

Olofsson T, Vasquez A (2008) Detection and Identification of a Novel Lactic Acid Bacterial Flora Within the Honey Stomach of the Honeybee Apis Mellifera
http://www.springerlink.com/content/r0l717g634346760/

Forsgren E, Olofsson T, Vasquez A, Fries I (2009) Novel lactic acid bacteria inhibiting Paenibacillus larvae in honey bee larvae
http://www.apidologie.org/index.php?opt ... 09040.html

Gilliam, Martha (1990) Chalkbrood Disease of Honey Bees, Apis Mellifera, Caused by the fungus, Ascosphaera apis: A Review of Past and Current Research
(available from USDA Carl Hayden Bee Lab, Tucson, Arizona)

Evans JD, Armstrong TN (2006) Antagonistic interactions between honey bee bacterial symbionts and implications for disease
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6785/6/4

Reynaldi FJ, Degusti MR, Alippi AM (1990) Inhibition of the Growth of Ascosphaera apis by Paenibacillus strains isolated from honey
http://www.scielo.org.ar/pdf/ram/v36n1/v36n1a11.pdf

Johnson RN, Zaman MT, Decelle MM, Siegel AJ, Tarpy DR, Siegel EC and Starks PT (2004) Multiple micro-organisms in chalkbrood mummies: evidence and implications
http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/entomology/api ... l.2005.pdf

Starks PT, Blackie CA, Seeley TD (2000) Fever in honeybee colonies
http://ase.tufts.edu/biology/labs/stark ... 202000.pdf

Biodiversity and ecophysiology of yeasts / Carlos Rosa, Gabor Peter (eds.). Berlin; London: Springer 2006

Wickelgren I, “Scientist solves secret of bee bread”, Science News, 1988
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m ... i_6809486/

Loper GM, Standifer LN, Thompson MJ and Gilliam M (1980) Biochemistry and Microbiology of Bee-Collected Almond (Prunus dulcis) Pollen and Bee Bread
http://www.apidologie.org/index.php?opt ... T0008.html

Gilliam M, Prest DB, Lorenz BJ (1988) Microbiology of pollen and bee bread: taxonomy and enzymology of molds
http://www.culturaapicola.com.ar/apunte ... 0-1/06.pdf

Gilliam, Martha (1979) Microbiology of pollen and bee bread: the yeasts
http://www.apidologie.org/index.php?opt ... T0006.html

Gilliam, Martha (1979) Microbiology of pollen and bee bread: the genus Bacillus
http://www.apidologie.org/index.php?opt ... RT0004.htm

Reynaldi FJ, Degusti MR, Alippi AM (1990) Inhibition of the Growth of Ascosphaera apis by Paenibacillus strains isolated from honey
http://www.scielo.org.ar/pdf/ram/v36n1/v36n1a11.pdf

OTHER SYMBIOTIC RELATIONSHIPS
Wheeler, William Morton (1907) The Fungus-Growing Ants of North America
http://antbase.org/ants/publications/10543/10543.pdf

Live-in Domestics: Mites as Maids in Tropical Rainforest Sweat Bee Nests (April 2009)
http://esciencenews.com/articles/2009/0 ... .bee.nests

“Gut Reactions”, Margonelli L, The Atlantic Magazine, September 2008
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/arc ... ions/6946/

Gilliam M, Prest D, Morton H (1974) Fungi isolated from honey bees, Apis mellifera, fed 2, 4-D and antibiotics
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_o ... archtype=a

Gilliam M, Morton H (1973) Enterobacteriaceae isolated from honey bees, Apis mellifera, treated with 2,4-D and antibiotics
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_o ... archtype=a

Gilliam M, Wickerham J, Morton H, Martin R (1974) Yeasts Isolated from Honey Bees, Apis Mellifera, Fed 2, 4-D and Antibiotics
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_o ... archtype=a

Gilliam M, Morton H (1977) The Mycroflora of Adult Worker Honeybees, Apis Mellifera: Effects of 2,4,5-T and Caging of Bee Colonies
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_o ... archtype=a
Cogito ergo summ.
Ich summe, also bien ich.

Benutzeravatar
zaunreiter
Administrator
Beiträge: 4840
Registriert: Do 5. Aug 2010, 19:14
Wohnort: Niederrhein
Kontaktdaten:

Re: Mikroben im Bienenstock

Beitragvon zaunreiter » Di 22. Nov 2011, 10:37

Und ich gehe demnächst damit auf die Jagd:

http://www.conrad.de/ce/de/product/1913 ... -bis-500-x

Ist schon geordert und in der Post. Mal sehen, was sich damit so im Bienenstock einfangen lässt. :P

Gruß
Bernhard
Cogito ergo summ.
Ich summe, also bien ich.

Manfred

Re: Mikroben im Bienenstock

Beitragvon Manfred » Mi 7. Dez 2011, 22:18

Wenn die Mikroben nicht werken
kann sich das Volk nicht stärken :

http://www.tb1.ethz.ch/PublicationsEO/P ... -19292.pdf

Herzliche Grüße Manfred

Benutzeravatar
zaunreiter
Administrator
Beiträge: 4840
Registriert: Do 5. Aug 2010, 19:14
Wohnort: Niederrhein
Kontaktdaten:

Re: Mikroben im Bienenstock

Beitragvon zaunreiter » Di 13. Dez 2011, 13:56

Das mobile Mikroskop ist da!

Erste Schnappschüsse =>

Die Haut meines Handrückens.
Bild

Bild

Obwohl ich artig geklopft habe, hat sich Herr Demodex brevis nicht gezeigt.
Bild

Bild

Varroa destructor von unten:
Bild

Bild

Wachskrümel:
Bild

Wachskrümel mit merkwürdigem Abdruck:
Bild

Wachskrümelmilbe - noch nicht näher definiert. Die ist mit bloßem Auge kaum zu erkennen - kleiner als ein Punkt "." im Buch. Nur aufgefallen, weil sie sich schnell bewegt.
Bild

Noch so ein Winzling - nur mit der Lupe zu entdecken. Irgendeine Larve.
Bild

Noch eine Varroa destructor.
Bild


Das Schwierigste war, diese Milbe überhaupt in einer höheren Vergrößerung zu photografieren - weil die unwahrscheinlich flink unterwegs ist. Da kommst Du mit dem Mikroskop kaum hinterher.
Bild

Bild

Ein Bienenei! Die Königin hat wohl ein Ei fallen lassen.
Bild


Um eine Übersicht zu bekommen fahre ich mit geringerer Vergrößerung über das "Substrat".
Bild


Am besten sind eigentlich die Videos - ich werde die mal in den nächsten Tagen einstellen - von krabbelnden Milben.
Ansonsten muß ich erst mal die Bedienungsanleitung lesen und das Gerät richtig einstellen. Das waren - wie gesagt - die ersten Schnappschüsse.

Es liegt eine Software bei, mit der die Bilder nachgearbeitet - und vermessen werden können. Die Software rechnet die Vergrößerung um und Du kannst dann ein virtuelles Lineal anlegen. Außerdem lassen sich die Bilder beschriften. Die Software habe ich noch nicht getestet.

Gruß
Bernhard
Cogito ergo summ.
Ich summe, also bien ich.

kaibee
Beiträge: 626
Registriert: Mo 9. Mai 2011, 21:53
Wohnort: Essen

Re: Mikroben im Bienenstock

Beitragvon kaibee » Di 13. Dez 2011, 16:42

Interessante Fotos!
Bin gespannt auf mehr!


Zurück zu „Sonstiges“